Category: Security

Ransomware Targets Healthcare
The Healthcare Ransomware Epidemic: How to Protect Your Patients
The Problem is Becoming a Crisis

Data breaches are happening at an alarming rate. In fact, the threat of ransomware attacks has become elevated to crisis levels. While there’s increased awareness, attacks are becoming more sophisticated. A variety of large and small organizations are being attacked. No one is immune. The healthcare industry has been and continues to be, prime targets. And for good reason. Healthcare organizations are considered low-hanging fruit by cybercriminals. Hackers know healthcare centers are notorious for having inefficient security. Most hospitals don’t have procedures in place to restore a network once locked by ransomware. Most applications in Hospitals have little or no network segmentation. There are no firewalls between workloads. Basic security protocols are not in place.

Besides the alarming ransomware statistics, there are some attacks that never get reported. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services experienced 52 data breaches in October. Last year, hackers stole over 38 million medical records. These sobering statistics have made the healthcare industry take notice. Many healthcare organizations are taking steps to increase cybersecurity. But more can be done. This article will take a look at some of the more recent ransomware cases. We’ll look at some mistakes that were made in dealing with cyberattacks. And we’ll offer ways to improve cybersecurity and protect patient data moving forward.

The consequences of a data breach reach far beyond the breaking news story. There’s more to it than the short news article that appears on your computer screen. A single attack can close down an organization for good. It can happen in a few minutes. The consequences can have long-lasting implications. This is particularly true for the healthcare industry. Sure, the reputation of the healthcare center gets flushed down the toilet, but there’s a real impact on the patients. These incidences are not merely expensive inconveniences. Cyberattacks disrupt the entire eco-system of the institution. It puts people’s health, safety, and lives at risk.

 

Healthcare Worker Distressed by Ransomware Locking up IT systems
Security breaches will cost healthcare organizations $6,000,000,000 this year.

 

Often, the healthcare center gets victimized twice. First, there is a ransomware attack. Second, the healthcare system becomes the target of a class-action lawsuit from a community of angry patients and their families.

Consider the New Scientist article about the 2016 attack on the Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center. It was a Friday afternoon when malware infected the institution’s computers. The attack seized patient data and prevented the staff from further communication. The date was February 5. The same day computer hackers tried to steal 1 billion from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. It all happened in a matter of seconds. Medical records had to be kept by using pen and paper. They used old fax machines. Patients were sent to other hospitals, operations canceled. The medical center was back on-line after a 2-week standoff. But not until after paying a ransom of 50 bitcoins (the equivalent of $17,000 at the time).

Malware can infect the entire computer system. Someone clicks on a link to a booby-trapped website or opens an attachment in a phishing email. Immediately, malicious malware gets to work encrypting the files. Some malware can immobilize entire IT infrastructures. If data is backed up and you get an attack of malware or something, you can always go back to yesterday’s data.
Healthcare targets often have their backs against the wall during a cyberattack. Because they don’t have their files backed up.

In most cases, a ransom is paid. The hackers deliver the decryption key. And medical centers are able to decrypt the seized files. The Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center was straight forward. They handled the crisis as best they could. See the above comments about using pen and paper. They negotiated a lower ransom and their data was returned. More recent victims haven’t been so lucky.

Medical malpractice has been part of the healthcare landscape since the 1960s. Now there is an additional risk of medical malpractice during ransomware attacks. If the ransomware attack affects the patient in any way, there will be repercussions.

Doctor Using Tablet
While only a few healthcare systems have policies around using mobile devices, there is a growing movement to regulate such devices.

Take the cyberattack on LifeBridge Health systems. Seven months after the incident, the Baltimore-based health system faced another problem. A class-action lawsuit was filed against them. The lawsuit claimed negligence on the part of the medical center. It also accused LifeBridge of waiting 2 months before informing the affected patients.

LifeBridge had to respond to the allegations. The organization contracted a national computer forensic team to investigate the attack. Patients were offered credit monitoring and identity protection services.

Clearly there are basic mistakes made that contribute to breaches. Mistakes can allow the infiltration to happen in the first place. Resolving a ransomware situation is stressful. People can do things that t make the situation worse.

Ransomware Recovery Mistakes

Health Management Concepts in Florida was attacked with ransomware. The official report was made on August 23. HMC learned about the incident on July 16. The ransom was paid. The attackers delivered the decryption keys. The hospital IT administration immediately took steps to decrypt the data. To their horror, the HMC staff realized they made the problem worse. They accidentally sent files containing patient information to the hackers.

UnityPoint Healthcare had the misfortune of suffering two security breaches in 2018. The second attack compromised the data of 1.4 million patients. At least, that’s the official tally. A series of phishing emails had been made to look like they were from a top executive within the company. An employee fell for the scam. It gave hackers the opportunity needed to penetrate the entire system.

The protection of healthcare assets is not just a matter of protecting patient information but protecting the patients themselves.
Recognizing the Risk is the First Step Toward Protecting Patient Information

The onslaught of cyberattacks against healthcare is relentless. There are inspiring stories of medical centers fighting back. They’re defending themselves against nefarious cyberattacks. They’re saving lots of money. Increasing their efficiency. And better protecting their patients.

One such story belongs to the Interfaith Medical Center of Brooklyn, New York. It’s a 287-bed non-profit teaching hospital that treats more than 250,000 patients every year. They were able to avoid malware outbreaks. Their proactive approach enabled them to detect and respond immediately to advancing threats. Their strategy involved an assessment of threats and implementation of policies and procedures.

Incident response time is critical. Measure it with a stopwatch, not a calendar. All the segmentation in the world isn’t any good if the door won’t be closed in time. Their program was successful. It identified malware infections long before they had a chance to become a problem. They were even able to identify a malware-infected medical device after it came back from a repair vendor.

The Interfaith Medical Center anticipated a ransomware attack and took steps to prepare for it. In a September 3, 2019, Healthcare IT News article, we learn how Christopher Frenz – the VP of Information Security protected the non-profit’s IT system. “One of the ways I approached this was simulating a mass malware outbreak within the hospital, using a custom-developed script and the EICAR test string. Running the script attempted to copy and execute the EICAR test string on each PC within the organization to simulate the lateral movement of a threat within the hospital. Exercises like these are great because they help an organization identify what security controls are effective, which controls are ineffective or in need of improvement, how well or not the staff response to an incident will be, and if there are any deficiencies in the organization’s incident response plan,” he explained.

Christopher Frenz, Interfaith Medical Center's VP of Information Security
Christopher Frenz, VP or Information Security at Interfaith Medical Center, led the charge with his zero trust architecture that protected the network from cyberattacks and saved the healthcare system millions of dollars.
“We have successfully avoided malware outbreaks and are actively detecting and responding to advanced threats, long before they impact privacy or operations.”

Christopher Frenz, Interfaith Medical Center

 

The article ends with some excellent advice from Frenz. “Healthcare needs to begin to focus on more than just compliance alone, as it is far too easy to achieve a state where an organization meets compliance requirements but is still woefully insecure. Organizations need to put their security to the test. Pick solutions that can empirically be shown to improve their security posture.”

 

There are basic steps healthcare organizations can take to minimize their risk of ransomware attacks. Learn as much as you can about ransomware attacks. Consider all possible points of entry. Where is your IT system vulnerable? Medical software used for patient data has numerous vulnerabilities. Healthcare cybersecurity statistics by Kaspersky Security Bulletin found easy access to 1500 devices used by healthcare professionals to process patient images such as X-rays.

 

Improving the cybersecurity of a healthcare organization, whether large or small, has two parts. One part has to do with the design and implementation of the IT system entire (i.e. whether-or-not there’s back-up and disaster recovery features in place). The other part has to do with your human capital.

 

Malware can be introduced from any number of locations along with your network. Often the attack is designed with multiple points of entry. It could be phishing emails where an employee is tricked into clicking on something that is booby-trapped. It could be a bogus email from what looks like an upper-level executive but is actually from a hacker.

 

ON-GOING EDUCATION AND REFRESHER COURSES
Healthcare Employees Being Educated on Cyber Security Procedures
Healthcare employees should have regular and comprehensive cyber threat education. This enables them to avoid falling into traps that can trigger ransomware. It also serves to establish a strong security culture.

Human beings make mistakes. This is especially true in the busy high-stress environments of hospitals. Or in situations where doctors, nurses, and orderlies work extended 10 to 12-hour shifts. People have to be educated about the risks of cyberattacks and what forms such attacks might take. It’s easy for a rushed employee, at the tail-end of their shift, to unknowingly click a file, download an unauthorized software, or be tricked into loading a contaminated thumb drive. There are basic security processes that should be implemented. These are things like creating strong passwords and changing them at regular intervals. Duel factor protection is also a good idea.

Cybercrooks study the vulnerability of humans. Hackers continually figure out ways to exploit human traits and their gullibility. Through social engineering tactics, cyber attackers design pathways to plant ransomware or get a foothold in an information system.

 

SECURITY IS NOT ABOUT QUICK FIXES

Take the time to ensure the staff and vendors are mindful of what they’re doing. Review policies and procedures regarding handling patient data. Review how to avoid security incidences. As we have seen, any data breach has legal ramifications. There needs to be a systematic response that is carefully considered and forged into a process. Additionally, partner with the right vendor who can design and provide a holistic security solution that will protect your patients.

Ransomware Risk Mitigation: The Desktop-as-a-Service Solution

Ransomware is a dangerous and growing threat. Find out how security-minded executives establish best-in-class protection.

2019 has proven to be an alarming year for cybersecurity professionals and cyber-attacks show no signs of slowing down in 2020.

One cybersecurity firm characterized the rapidly growing pace of cyberthreats across all industries as an “unprecedented and unrelenting barrage”. Within 24 hours of its report, the City of New Orleans and several other municipal organizations fell victim to ransomware attacks.

But it’s not just large-scale enterprises and public institutions that are under attack. Small and mid-sized businesses offer low-hanging fruit for opportunistic cyber criminals, who often use automation to widen their area of attack.

Small businesses, large enterprises, and public institutions alike have all struggled to respond decisively to the ransomware threat. Until recently, executives had few options – and fewer defenses – in their fight against cybercrime. Now, Desktop as a Service (DaaS) solutions offer comprehensive, scalable ransomware protection services to organizations of all sizes.

 

What Exactly is Ransomware and How Does It Work?

 

There are a number of ways for a cyber intruder to take over your computer system without your knowledge. You won’t know about it until it’s too late.

The typical ransomware attack begins with the stealthy takeover of the victim’s computer. This may be accomplished through phishing, social engineering, or a sophisticated zero-day exploit – the goal is to have access to the network while remaining undetected.

Upon compromising the network, the cybercriminal can begin slowly encrypting important files. Most ransomware applications do this automatically, using a variety of different methods to evade detection. The process may take days, weeks, or months to complete.

Once the ransomware encryption algorithm reaches critical mass, it then locks users out of the network, displaying a ransom note demanding payment for a decryption key. Sometimes the demand is small – on the order of $500 to $1000 – and sometimes the demand reaches into six-figure sums.

Ransom demands are usually for bitcoins. “If one organization is willing to pay $500,000, the next may be willing to pay $600,000.”

Small sums make paying the ransom a tempting option, but a dangerous one. There is no guarantee that the cyber attacker will relinquish control of the network. Instead, executives who pay up reinforce the cybercriminal profit cycle. It is only a matter of time before the ransomware attacker strikes again.

Famous examples of ransomware variants include WannaCry, which spread to over 230,000 computers across 150 countries in 2017, and Petya. The WannaCry crisis targeted healthcare clinics and hospitals, causing untold damage and highlighted the risk that outdated IT systems represent in these industries.

Petya was unique because it did not encrypt specific files. Instead, it encrypted the local hard drive’s Master File Table, rendering the entire device unusable. There are dozens of other variants out there, and each one uses a unique strategy to take advantage of victims. NotPetya developed on Petya’s attack method, using the same vulnerability previously exploited by WannaCry.

Who Is At Risk of Ransomware Attacks?

 

Emsisoft reports that during the first half of 2019, 491 healthcare providers were hit with ransomware. The attacks are increasing and the demands are for larger ransoms.

Everyone. Although high-profile targets like hospitals and municipal institutions make headlines, thousands of business owners are defrauded every day. On average, one business falls victim to ransomware every 14 seconds.

Small and mid-sized businesses are especially vulnerable because they typically do not have access to the kind of comprehensive security resources that large enterprises can afford. Small businesses that do not rely on reputable third-party managed service providers make especially easy targets.

Cybercriminals have shown that they are willing to target hospitals and public institutions without shame. The greater the need for functioning IT systems is, the more likely the cybercriminals are to get paid. This is how the cybercrime profit cycle perpetuates itself.

What Can Small and Mid-sized Businesses Do About Ransomware?

 

Organizations caught unprepared have few options. Although cybersecurity experts correctly warn against paying the ransom, desperate business owners often pay anyways. But the relief is only temporary. 60% of small and mid-sized businesses victimized by cybercriminals do not recover and shut down within six months.

Preparation is key to successfully resisting a ransomware attack. Organizations that cannot afford to develop, implement, and deploy state-of-the-art security resources need to contract a reputable third-party vendor for the purpose.

Even enterprise-level organizations with tens of thousands of employees often find themselves opting for a managed solution instead of an in-house one. The cybersecurity industry is experiencing a widening talent shortage, making it difficult even for deep-pocketed businesses to hold on to their best security officers.

Introducing IronOrbit: Comprehensive Ransomware Protection

IronOrbit achieves best-in-class ransomware protection through a unique approach to cloud desktop hosting. There are three key processes that must work together flawlessly to guarantee ransomware resilience:

1.   Prevention

The best way to prevent a ransomware attack from taking place is preventing the initial malware deployment. Firewalls, email filters, content filters, and constant patch management all play a critical role in keeping malicious code out of DaaS systems.

Maintaining up-to-date software is more important than most executives and employees realize. Since NotPetya used the same attack vector as WannaCry, its victims entirely consisted of individuals and businesses who neglected to install security patches after the WannaCry crisis.

2.   Recovery

There is no way to guarantee 100% prevention. However, business owners and their IT teams can circumvent the damage ransomware causes with consistent backup and restoration tools. IronOrbit’s disaster recovery features can wind back the clock, reloading your entire suite of business systems to the state they were in just before the attack occurred.

3.   Remediation

Ransomware recovery cannot guarantee business continuity on its own without best-in-class remediation tools. Without the ability to trace the attack to its source in a fully logged environment, there is no way to tell whether the attack has been truly averted or not. IronOrbit uses state-of-the-art digital investigation tools to track ransomware attacks to their source and mitigate them.

Schedule a Consultation with an IronOrbit Security Expert

IronOrbit has helped numerous businesses capitalize on the efficiency and peace of mind that secure DaaS solutions offer. Protect your business from the threat of ransomware with the help of our expertise and knowledge.

 

Microsoft Intune Review: Putting It Up Against MobileIron

The world we live in is changing at an amazing pace.

The innovation enabled by the rapid growth and worldwide adoption of the internet has been absolutely incredible. Surely that’s no surprise to anyone connected today, but let’s take a moment to put it into perspective the jaw-dropping scope of the number of connected devices.

One of the trendiest buzzwords to hit the market today is the IoT (Internet of things). The IoT is exactly what it sounds like; a collection of devices that connect to the internet.

Map of the IOT landscape across the globe.
The Internet of Things

This could be anything from your Nest thermostat, that Tesla roadster parked in your garage, or the far more common smartphone sitting in your back pocket. Sounds like that could be a lot of connected ‘things’, right? Well, as of 2018, the IoT was a $151B market with 7B connected devices and is expected to reach 10B by 2020.

What exactly does this have to do with MobileIron or Intune? Well, as the number of connected devices skyrockets, organizations are scrambling to protect their data that could invariably find their way to those devices.

Traditionally, a business would view their datacenter as the security boundary. But as we dive into a more cloud-first, a mobile-first world that simply is no longer true. We need to ensure that data is protected, regardless of which ‘thing’ it ends up on. In order to accomplish that, businesses are transitioning to unified endpoint management (UEM) solutions like Intune and MobileIron.

Let’s dive into this Microsoft Intune review.

Application Management

In the past, companies would use device management solutions to enforce strict control over devices before granting them access. Sounds good, right? Well, what about situations where end-users bring their own devices or try to access your data from a device not owned by your company?

Sure, you could choose to block those devices but that means you’ll need to provide those users with devices to work with remotely. Even in that scenario, most individuals would prefer not to carry a personal device and a work device.

Modern management solutions take that struggle into account and allow application-level control of your data, regardless of what devices it ends up on. This is where solutions like Intune or MobileIron shine. They allow you to ensure that data you’re putting on a specific device stays on that device.

Mobile Device Management - MDM - separates and secures corporate data from personal data.
Mobile Device Management allows you to separate and secure corporate data from personal data.

You’re able to enforce data encryption. You’re able to ensure the data can’t be moved to an unmanaged location. As an administrator, you are able to effectively remove your data from that device when necessary.

Comparing Intune versus MobileIron in Managing Your Data

Now let’s take a minute to compare both Intune and MobileIron when it comes to managing your data on end-user owned devices (BYOD). Both solutions offer great functionality here; they grant you the ability to ensure that your data doesn’t leave the application that it started in. No copy/paste, no save to the device, no save to unsupported cloud locations, enforce encryption, etc.

The problem is that both solutions require you to use their client (Outlook, OneDrive, Apps, Docs, or Mail+). Things like the default applications in iOS and Android are out of the question due to a lack of SDK (Software Development Kit) support.

MobileIron struggles here because typically, in order for you to actually get the required app, you need to enroll the device and enforce a wider area of control. More control than some individuals are comfortable granting to their employer over their personal devices.

Intune’s MAM

Microsoft’s Intune allows for application management (MAM) without enrollment. Simply use the Outlook app (or OneDrive, SharePoint, Box, Dropbox, etc.) and sign-in from any device as you normally would to access your data. At that point, policies created by the administrator are enforced on the application itself and not on the device. Again, the goal here is to prevent someone from taking sensitive information and copying directly to their iOS mail app and forwarding it outside of your scope of influence.

Intune MAM illustration
Intune MAM separates and protects your personal from corporate data.

Consider that the Enterprise Mobility and Security license required for Intune also includes Azure AD Premium for auditing and reporting in Azure as well as Conditional Access to restrict access or require multifactor and it’s a pretty compelling argument for Intune.

The official graphic from Microsoft for Azure Active Directory Premium.

 Device Management

Management of the device as a whole is a little easier to accomplish and has been an industry mainstay for a decade. Both Intune and MobileIron are excellent options if you’re going to require all devices to be enrolled and managed centrally.

In fact, MobileIron was selected as the industry leader by Gartner in 2017. The problem of needing specific applications on the device to access the data is easily overcome by simply pushing the required application to the device in question.

Of course there’s more to working remotely than just using applications; you’re also able to push configuration like WiFi profiles to allow them to automatically connect to the office WiFi or deploying certificates to the device to allow a more secure, seamless sign in experience when they open up their work apps.

Requiring enrollment is the big gotcha here. It’s difficult to require an end-user to enroll their device; after all, it is theirs. And what happens when one of those 10B other connected devices is able to be integrated in the near future (here’s looking at you Alexa, Cortona, and Ford)?

Trending Forward

This is a 3D graphic illustrating how enterprise data is integrated securely, from the company's server to a mobile device information provider using MobileIron.

While MobileIron may be a great option for mobile device management today, there are some glaring limitations that they need to address. Today, MobileIron is truly only an MDM/MAM solution with Android and iOS in mind. It struggles with cloud integration for the directory which means that the future is a little murky when there may no longer be an on-premises ‘identity’ for your users.

It also doesn’t have a way to integrate Windows devices (or platforms that may operate as ‘dumb’ devices, like Alexa); which will be a key differentiator in the future as more and more of that IoT make their way into the business landscape.

Intune is already built with Azure Active Directory as it’s backbone to provide conditional access, multifactor authentication, and all the analytics and telemetry you need to find out who signed in, how many times, and from where.

Microsoft has positioned Intune as the clear replacement of System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) for modern endpoint management, all while allowing for device co-management with SCCM still in the picture to handle legacy endpoints.

Intune Takes the Lead

Not only has Microsoft built a solution in Intune that disrupted the enterprise mobility market, they immediately doubled down by partnering with other major players to ensure that as industry evolves, they’ll not be left out.

Now all this isn’t to say that MobileIron (or any of the other current solutions) isn’t an excellent answer to the problem of securing your data on mobile devices. MobileIron scales incredibly well with numerous deployments exceeding 100,000k devices and there’s an on-premises offering for organizations that are entirely cloud adverse.

But the question really is; why would I choose MobileIron over Intune and considering the way that Microsoft has positioned themselves to take advantage of connected devices in the future with Azure, MobileIron has a tough time standing up.

SECURITY WARNING: The OpenSSL ‰ÛÏHeartbleed Bug‰Û

If you‰Ûªve ever submitted any kind of private or sensitive information to a website‰ÛÓincluding usernames, passwords, credit card numbers, social security numbers, addresses, and phone numbers‰ÛÓthis security alert applies to you.

This week, security researchers discovered a serious vulnerability in the OpenSSL encryption software. Two-thirds of all websites use OpenSSL, as do many email, instant messaging, and virtual private network (VPN) services.

These services use OpenSSL to establish an encrypted connection between them and the user (or between two or more users) to prevent the data transferred between the two from being intercepted.

Usually, not all of the pages on a website that uses OpenSSL are encrypted. Just the pages that require a secure connection. Like those where the users input their usernames and passwords or submit their credit card information.

The Heartbleed Bug Explained

The vulnerability in question has been nicknamed the ‰ÛÏHeartbleed Bug,‰Û since it is located in the code for the ‰ÛÏheartbeat extension,‰Û a part of OpenSSL that controls how long a secure connection can remain open.

A hacker could use this vulnerability to gain access to OpenSSL‰Ûªs encryption keys. Which could then be used to intercept and decode all data sent to and from the service.åÊ As well as steal access to any existing info stored in the service‰Ûªs databases.

Therefore, not only could a hacker with the OpenSSL encryption keys of a website intercept any data (usernames, passwords, credit card info, etc.) you send to the site after it‰Ûªs been hacked. The data that you submitted to the site in the years before the infiltration occurred is also at risk.

The first version of OpenSSL to include the ‰ÛÏHeartbleed Bug‰Û was released in December 2011. In addition, exploits of this vulnerability don‰Ûªt leave any trace. So, it‰Ûªs impossible to tell if a hacker has ever used the vulnerability to intercept or steal data from a certain website.

How to Protect Yourself From the HeartBleed Bug

The ‰ÛÏHeartbleed Bug‰Û in no way affects any of IronOrbit‰Ûªs hosted solutions, our website, or any of the systems that we use to process and store your payment information.

In general, though, here is what you need to do in order to protect yourself from this vulnerability:

  • Make sure that a site is secure before you send any of your sensitive data to it. You can use this app to check if a site has a secure version of OpenSSL.
  • Make a list of all of the websites that you‰Ûªve ever sent sensitive data to. Change your passwords for these websites only after you‰Ûªve confirmed that they are running a secure version of OpenSSL. Or alternatively, that they never used the insecure version of OpenSSL.
  • Find out if your company‰Ûªs website used or is using OpenSSL versions 1.01 through 1.01f. If it is, update OpenSSL to version 1.01g immediately. Then, replace your encryption keys, and ask any users that your site has to reset their passwords.

To ask for assistance in responding to the ‰ÛÏHeartbleed Bug‰Û or for more information, IronOrbit users should contact IronOrbit 24x7x365 technical support at [email protected] or (888) 753-5064.